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Housing, hope through Habitat | Sampson Independent

Housing, hope through Habitat | Sampson Independent
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Fayetteville Humanity District plans to build two homes per year in Sampson County and sell them to eligible low-to-medium income partner families on an affordable mortgage.  photo courtesy

Fayetteville Humanity District plans to build two homes per year in Sampson County and sell them to eligible low-to-medium income partner families on an affordable mortgage.

photo courtesy

CLINTON – Two new homes will be coming to Clinton thanks to Fayetteville, the home of humanity.

The project has begun, said Daniel Collins, director of faith and community relations at FAHFH, with hopes of being in full swing by the middle of next year. It is expected to be completed at the end of the year.

“FAHFH plans to build two homes per year in Sampson County and sell them to eligible low-to-middle-income partner families on an affordable mortgage,” Collins said.

“We are excited to try and build two homes here per year,” he said. “This is hope.”

One thing is for sure, building these homes is expensive. It is estimated that it takes $250,000 to build two homes each year. Currently, they need to raise about $40,000 more to make this happen for these two homes, which will be on Williams Street and West Johnson Street, close to each other.

The money raised in Sampson will stay in Sampson. FAHFH began making footprints in Sampson County several years ago before a home was completed in 2019 for the Davis family. Another home, Sandra Taylor on Williams Street, was dedicated in early 2021, another home project.

“At least by the middle of the year we should really start building these,” Collins said of the next two homes on the horizon. “The foundations have been poured here.”

He said that traditionally there was a chaplain’s breakfast here to bring religious communities together, and this is something that is being explored.

“We want to be able to give them an update on how things are going and how they can get involved.”

They have quite a bit of money aside, and grants are often one way they make these homes happen. Closing homes improves the workplace, he said, and can help cut costs, as well as build more community.

“Home sites are mainly dependent on large donations,” Collins noted.

Construction will begin in early 2022, but should be in full swing by the middle of the year. As of now, one family has been selected, and they are still looking for more applicants for the other home, and future homes in the next few years.

“Our goal is to build all of these within the next two or three years here at Clinton and we are excited about that,” said Ron Gunter, former CEO of FAHFH. “But we all work together and we’re excited about it.”

In addition to the two occupied homes, Habitat aims to build on four other plots and is seeking family participation in the program.

Fayetteville Habitats was founded in 1988 as a Christian ministry and non-profit organization with the goal of helping residents become homeowners. Participants are required to spend hundreds of equivalent working hours, while taking lessons on home ownership and financial literacy. Selected participants are also required to pay a low-interest mortgage. In addition to Sampson and Cumberland counties, assistance is also provided to families in Bladen.

A second major goal is to “build awareness of FAHFH’s work in Sampson County and invite volunteers to prepare to provide assistance with home construction beginning in early 2022.”

Another aspect of the project is that they are working on expanding the size of their homes. The size of their house is now quite small at first, and this allows them to give more space to their occupants.

According to Habitat officials, eligible, board-certified partner families complete 300 hours of equity and home ownership training before they get the opportunity to purchase a Habitat home with an affordable mortgage. Homes are built to high energy efficiency standards that significantly reduce energy costs for homeowners. Homes were also built to be accessible to persons with disabilities.

As funding allows, FAHFH also runs a repair program for homeowners in need, especially veterans, hurricane victims and elderly homeowners. FAHFH’s service area includes Bladen, Cumberland, and Sampson counties.

Reach out to Emily M. Williams at 910-590-9488. Follow her on Twitter @NCNewsWriter. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

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